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Review: Trilogy of Terror II (1996)

Directed by: Dan Curtis | 91 minutes | , thriller | Actors: , , , , , , Thomas Mitchell, Gerry Quigley, , , Alan Bridle, , , , , Alex Carter , , Tom Melissis, Aron Tager, Durward Allen,

This 1996 ‘Trilogy of Terror’ is a second part following the 1975 first part of the same name, again directed by Dan Curtis. In the first film actress Karen Black played the leading roles in the various stories, here it is actress Lysette Anthony.

1. The Graveyard Rats
Laura and her lover Ben murder Laura’s tyrannical husband Ansford by pushing him down the stairs in his wheelchair. To get their hands on the estate, they must be able to access his bank accounts. They discover that the data to that effect is on Ansford’s in his grave. They set course for the grave, but once there, events take on unexpected forms. The cold-blooded murder of Ansford and the events in his grave and in the corridors dug around it by the rats make this a successful story. Night scenes, a good use of light and dark, unexpected twists and turns and a claustrophobic atmosphere in the underground corridors when Laura has to keep off the attacking rats. The rats are quite exaggerated in appearance, but in all terrifyingness it makes them seem all the more effective. The story has a successful ironic and melancholy ending.

2. Bobby
Bobby’s mother cannot cope with the death of her son and manages to raise him from the dead by magic. However, Bobby no longer turns out to be the one he was when his aggressive behavior turns into outright murder and his mother has to run from him. Qualitatively the least story in the film. Repeatedly, however, it is effective when the malicious Bobby’s intentions become apparent and confrontations of various kinds with his mother take place. The setting is also suitable when the events take place in a quiet and secluded country house. With some magic, some other supernatural touches and a dark and stormy evening, a dark atmosphere is also sufficiently achieved. Unfortunately, the whole thing gets bogged down somewhat in a relatively long and not clearly visible chase,

3. He Who Kills
In Dr. Simpson is brought in a doll for examination. The doll is said to contain the ghost of a Zuni warrior, an attached letter reads. The doll comes to life and kills a few guards after which Dr. Simpson has to do all he can to keep the doll at bay. A successful story. It ties in with ‘Amelia’ in ‘Trilogy of Terror’ after Amelia’s murderous plans are put into effect. The disadvantage is that in the images of the coming to life Zunipop it is quite predictable when the doll has lost nothing of its murderous lust and bloodlust and this story is mainly a remake of the events in ‘Amelia’. But it doesn’t make the way it is designed any less successful. Chases and brutal and gory confrontations with the Zunipop take place again. These are worked out in an exciting and entertaining way in the extremely suitable long corridors and empty spaces of the laboratory. And above all, a welcome and successful reunion with the scary noises emitting and for the horror fan heart-conquering Zunipop in his undiminished maniacal and possessed and at the same time humorous biting and stabbing behavior. Good camerawork again during the various confrontations and chases. And above all, a welcome and successful reunion with the scary noises emitting and for the horror fan heart-conquering Zunipop in his undiminished maniacal and possessed and at the same time humorous biting and stabbing behavior. Good camerawork again during the various confrontations and chases. And above all, a welcome and successful reunion with the scary noises emitting and for the horror fan heart-conquering Zunipop in his undiminished maniacal and possessed and at the same time humorous biting and stabbing behavior. Good camerawork again during the various confrontations and chases.

Just like in the first film from 1975, there is solid acting from the various parties involved. Lysette Anthony is less known and less charismatic than Karen Black, but as Black’s successor she is nevertheless a good choice if she also knows how to portray the various characters with their different characters in a credible way. Also decent work by the other people involved, although in ‘He Who Kills’ outside Anthony himself, not very striking because of the limited screen time allocated to the other human characters. In ‘Bobby’ solid work by Blake Heron who manages to portray the risen Bobby in a convincing and threatening manner. And in ‘Graveyard Rats’ neat work by Geraint Wyn Davies as Laura’s lover and henchman Ben and Matt Clark as the tyrannical Ansford.

It makes this ‘Trilogy of Terror II’, following the first film, another meritorious trilogy. Again a film in which the necessary negatives occur, but also one in which the pluses far exceed these. Also because director Curtis, just like in the first film – partly because this second film was also made for television – does not so much need to have too many gory special effects, but manages to achieve a successful build-up of the tension and effective retention of it. . It makes this sequel film again an advisable horror or thriller trilogy. One that will also captivate non-horror fans.

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