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Review: Up in the Air (2009)

Directed by: | 109 minutes | , | Actors: George Clooney, Vera Farmiga, Anna Kendrick, Jason Bateman, , , James Anthony, Steve Eastin, , Doug Fesler, Tamala Jones, Andrew Kruczynski, , Adam Rose, Lauren Mae Shafer, Sarah Arend , James Edward Ashton, Marvin Baldwin Jr., Courtney Benjamin, Zachary Borromeo, , Ed Callison, Shawn I. Chevalier, Mike Comstock, , , , , Joe Hammerstone, , Alexandria Iona, Dan Katzenberger,

Thanks to ‘Thank You for Smoking’ (2005) and ‘Juno’ (2007), Jason Reitman is considered one of the most refreshing young filmmakers in Hollywood. Originally he had planned to make his debut with ‘Up in the Air’. In 2002 he started writing a script. In the meantime, opportunities arose to make ‘Thank You for Smoking’ and ‘Juno’. ‘Up in the Air’ was shelved. America – and subsequently the rest of the world – went from a rosy situation to an economic slump. Reitman made good use of this by adapting his script, about a crisis manager who is always on the move, to the economic situation in the world. The main character, Ryan Bingham, makes a living firing people. To dress up his with authentic images, Reitman’s producers placed ads in local papers in St. Louis and Detroit: “Have you been fired recently? Then sign up! ‘ The film team posed as makers and asked those who showed up to treat the camera like the person who fired them. They were also asked to say what they would have liked to say when they were fired, but did not dare. Reitman used a number of reactions in his film. They were also asked to say what they would have liked to say when they were fired, but did not dare. Reitman used a number of reactions in his film. They were also asked to say what they would have liked to say when they were fired, but did not dare. Reitman used a number of reactions in his film.

‘Up in the Air’ is all about Ryan Bingham, a role that is made for George Clooney. Bingham is a career transition consultant, which means that he makes a living by putting others out on the street. He flies from one city to another because his field of work covers the entire country. Ryan lives out of his suitcase and spends more time on planes than in his neglected apartment. Not that he mind. On the contrary: he wouldn’t know how to live his life if he were ‘home’ more often. Now that the economy is in tough times, it is a booming business for Ryan. He is overjoyed, especially when he bumps into a beautiful woman who lives a life just like him. With this Alex (Vera Farmiga) he searches his overcrowded agenda for dates when they are in the same place – or nearby – to meet. Both love to do what they want without any obligations. But then a doom image emerges: Ryan’s boss Craig (Jason Bateman) has to cut back and is seriously interested in the idea of ​​recently graduated smart-ass Natalie (Anna Kendrick) to do the layoffs via webcam from now on. Ryan’s job is under threat. To convince Craig that business can’t do without people like him, he takes Natalie on a trip to show her what work is all about: how mobile he should be, how isolated he lives, and how he copes with disappointment. of the people he has to expel. do whatever they feel like doing. But then a doom image emerges: Ryan’s boss Craig (Jason Bateman) has to cut back and is seriously interested in the idea of ​​recently graduated smart-ass Natalie (Anna Kendrick) to do the layoffs via webcam from now on. Ryan’s job is under threat. To convince Craig that business can’t do without people like him, he takes Natalie on a trip to show her what work is all about: how mobile he should be, how isolated he lives, and how he copes with disappointment. of the people he has to expel. do whatever they feel like doing. But then a doom image emerges: Ryan’s boss Craig (Jason Bateman) has to cut back and is seriously interested in the idea of ​​recently graduated smart-ass Natalie (Anna Kendrick) to do the layoffs via webcam from now on. Ryan’s job is under threat. To convince Craig that business can’t do without people like him, he takes Natalie on a trip to show her what work is all about: how mobile he should be, how isolated he lives, and how he copes with disappointment. of the people he has to expel. Ryan’s job is under threat. To convince Craig that business can’t do without people like him, he takes Natalie on a trip to show her what work is all about: how mobile he should be, how isolated he lives, and how he copes with disappointment. of the people he has to expel. Ryan’s job is under threat. To convince Craig that business can’t do without people like him, he takes Natalie on a trip to show her what work is all about: how mobile he should be, how isolated he lives, and how he copes with disappointment. of the people he has to expel.

Their joint trip changes both Anna’s and Ryan’s lives. The ambitious Anna learns a number of wise life lessons that she could never have experienced from behind her computer. For the first time in a long time, Ryan is stuck with another person, whom he has to take into account. In between, he meets – more and more often – with Alex, with whom he seems to feel more than he dares to admit to himself. When Ryan is invited to the wedding of his sister, who, like the rest of his , he hasn’t seen in years, he realizes for the first time how terribly lonely he really is. In one film, ‘Up in the Air’ captures not only the fears and worries of many people in modern America, but also their pleasure and enjoyment. The tough economic climate, the constant fear of losing your job, loneliness and alienation, but also the trend to put your career first. Reitman packs it all into a very pleasant film that is genre-overlapping, makes you laugh and will not leave anyone untouched. Some people are like Ryan; they live to work and not the other way around. The work is the reward, not the money you get for it. For others, it is all about the money they so desperately need to pay their mortgage and support their families. These are traditional values, which ultimately count more – as ‘Up in the Air’ teaches us – than the restless, lonely life of Ryan. Because what’s the point of your five million air miles if you don’t have anyone to share them with? Reitman packs it all into a very pleasant film that is genre-overlapping, makes you laugh and will not leave anyone untouched. Some people are like Ryan; they live to work and not the other way around. The work is the reward, not the money you get for it. For others, it’s just about the money they need so badly to pay their mortgage and support their family. These are traditional values, which ultimately count more – as ‘Up in the Air’ teaches us – than the restless, lonely life of Ryan. Because what’s the point of your five million air miles if you don’t have anyone to share them with? Reitman packs it all into a very pleasant film that is genre-overlapping, makes you laugh and will not leave anyone untouched. Some people are like Ryan; they live to work and not the other way around. The work is the reward, not the money you get for it. For others, it’s just about the money they need so badly to pay their mortgage and support their family. These are traditional values, which ultimately count more – as ‘Up in the Air’ teaches us – than the restless, lonely life of Ryan. Because what’s the point of your five million air miles if you don’t have anyone to share them with? not the money you get for it. For others, it’s just about the money they need so badly to pay their mortgage and support their family. These are traditional values, which ultimately count more – as ‘Up in the Air’ teaches us – than the restless, lonely life of Ryan. Because what’s the point of your five million air miles if you don’t have anyone to share them with? not the money you get for it. For others, it’s just about the money they need so badly to pay their mortgage and support their family. These are traditional values, which ultimately count more – as ‘Up in the Air’ teaches us – than the restless, lonely life of Ryan. Because what’s the point of your five million air miles if you don’t have anyone to share them with?

Nobody around him understands Ryan’s way of life. His family has not seen him for years and his new colleague Anna looks at him as if he is from another planet. Leave it to George Clooney to convincingly portray the self-righteous charmer. Cool and calculating, he makes his plan, nothing seems to get in the way. Or is it…? Clooney gets an excellent match from his opponents. The crackling chemistry between him and Vera Farmiga is all over the place. The young Anna Kendrick convincingly and realistically portrays the stubborn Natalie, initially she is still full of big plans, but due to damage and shame she soon becomes worldly-wise. Jason Bateman is surprisingly demure as Ryan’s boss Craig. There are nice supporting roles by JK Simmons and Zach Galifianakis as ‘victims’ of dismissal king Clooney. Reitman has shot his film brilliantly. ‘Up in the Air’ is decorated with funny close-ups and beautifully framed compositions. The aerial shots with which the film opens are also more than worthwhile, as is Rolfe Kent’s score. You could say that everything is right about this warm, funny mix of drama and comedy. Up in the Air has been very well received in America. The film is even mentioned as one of the main candidates for the annual Oscar Gala and that is more than justified. Up in the Air has been very well received in America. The film is even mentioned as one of the main candidates for the annual Oscar Gala and that is more than justified. Up in the Air has been very well received in America. The film is even mentioned as one of the main candidates for the annual Oscar Gala and that is more than justified.

Jason Reitman already has two excellent films to his credit and ‘Up in the Air’ is a worthy third film. Perhaps its most complete and convincing to date. This successful comedy drama holds up a mirror to its viewers. Reitman observes, moves, makes his viewers laugh and touches the nerve more than once. Moreover, he does not choose the easy way out of a predictable happy ending, which is wonderfully refreshing. Fine piece of craftsmanship!

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