The best site for Movie News, Movie Reviews, Trailers and everything you want to know about Movies and Cinema of All Around the World..

Review: Une nuit terrible-A Terrible Night (1896)

Directed by: | 1 minute | , , short | Actors: Georges Méliès

‘Une nuit terrible’, also known as ‘A Terrible Night’ by film pioneer George Méliès has a rather short running time of just 1 minute. Quite short perhaps, but not so strange when you consider that this film dates from 1896, a year from the early years of the film. A time when the film audience of that time was logically not used to much and it was just as interesting for the filmmakers to make and release films as to test the reactions of the audience.

The story itself is, certainly by contemporary standards, not too much. A man lies in bed, blows out a candle and then sees a large, fallen beetle crawling over the blankets and climbing up the wall. As simple as it may be, it is something that was fascinating enough to watch at the time. Just as this is now the case for the contemporary viewer when the man in question, designed for Méliès herself, throws his entire into battle. And with a ‘coincidentally’ broom standing next to his bed, he is hitting, stomping and jumping on the beetle. The beetle has turned out so big that it leaves something to be desired in terms of credibility, but is all the more appealing. And it makes the images in which the man tries to destroy the beetle very amusing. The aggression, The irritation and frustration that the man exudes are recognizable: proof that human emotional traits that disrupt the uninvited night’s sleep are apparently timeless. Incidentally, the most expressive facial expressions that are often present in silent films do not play a role here. The man in question is not too close to the camera and is not particularly focused on it. It is body language that strikes the clock and is convincing enough because of all the obvious and identifying recognisability. The man in question is not too close to the camera and is not particularly focused on it. It is body language that strikes the clock and is convincing enough because of all the obvious and identifying recognisability. The man in question is not too close to the camera and is not particularly focused on it. It is body language that strikes the clock and is convincing enough because of all the obvious and identifying recognisability.

Also characteristic of films from this era are the scratches, spots, light fog and the not too sharp contours of the man, the beetle and the objects in the images. Once taken, there is no deviation from the camera angle, but that will be the worst for the average film lover and film historian when viewing a production from such an early year. Furthermore, there are understandably not too many special effects in this film, except in the design of the beetle whose legs seem to move separately. Despite the relatively small danger that a beetle emits, this will probably evoke some chills. To the heartwarming delight of the horror fan and the horror historians, this (first?) ‘Giant bug’ production can perhaps also be counted as one of the first horror or horror-oriented films. But in the end it is clear that bringing humor and entertainment is in Méliès film. Mandatory and amusing food for film historians, comedies and silent film enthusiasts.

You might also like
Comments
Loading...